Posts labeled Nineteenth Century

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Review - Beware Mohawks Bearing Gifts by SA Collins

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In an alternate universe, the British did not abandon the native Americans at the Treaty of Paris, ending the American revolution, and kept their promise to help the tribes establish their own homeland. Twenty years later, tensions are high between the confederated native lands and the nascent United States, which is hemmed in between the natives and the Atlantic Ocean. In New York, William Hallet is a bit of a dandy but has a taste for adventure.

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Review - The Celestial

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This review originally appeared on Speak Its Name. As “The Celestial” opens, Todd is working his claim in the mountains near Truckee, about 90 miles northeast of Sacramento. It’s about 20 years after the California gold rush started, but there are still a lot of men like Todd staking claims and hoping to strike it rich. Egged on by his irascible uncle, who was invalided in the civil war, Todd has stole away in the night, leaving his mother to care for her brother on their tumble-down farm near Sacramento.

Inspiration - Song of the Loon

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Song of the Loon by Richard Amory So, I was on my morning bike ride (cardio, don’t you know) and this random thought entered my head, which happens a lot. It’s how I get a lot of my ideas. Only this random thought was a memory of a book I’d read a few years ago, one that was rather influential for me in my writing, but which I haven’t talked about.

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Review - Cawnpore

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This review originally appeared at Speak Its Name. Cawnpore picks up more or less where the author’s previous work, The White Rajah, left off. Like the first book, this one takes the form of a memoir of the fictional John Williamson. Williamson has parted company with his employer and lover James Brooke after the inquiry into the battles that firmly established Brooke as the “White Rajah”. While Williamson is still in love with Brooke, the ghosts of all the people killed in Brooke’s name has driven a firm wedge between them.

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Review - Frost Fair

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Gideon Frost is a man skating on thin ice, almost literally. The young printer is barely keeping his business together, and his creditors are circling outside his door. He’s only just getting by, and when the need arises he’s not above selling his body for a few shillings to make ends meet. His one hope to get things back to black, for a while at least, is a commission for an engraving of Joshua Redfern’s new house.

Siamese Men of the Nineteenth Century

[caption id="attachment_89” align="alignright” width="184” caption="Siamese boatman of the nineteenth century”][/caption]  In the “Journey” books, I’ve struggled a bit to describe the typical dress of the men of Southeast Asia, particularly Siam, in the nineteenth century. I’ve seen plenty of descriptions and illustrations, but how to describe it? It’s a bit more than a ‘loincloth’ but not quite trousers. As luck would have it, in my other role as a travel writer I recently came across a rare nineteenth century photograph of a commoner.